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5 Ways To Protect Your FB Account from Hacking

Vicent | Friday, October 13, 2017 |




You've probably heard that Facebook accounts are being duplicated to retrieve personal data, but you may not know how easy it can be for hackers. With hackers who are increasingly using Facebook as a primary source of information for users and businesses who use their information to make decisions about their tariffs, should really have a plan to protect themselves.


Here are some tips to avoid being hacked:

1. Use strong passwords.


The names of you, your spouse, your parents, your brothers and sisters, your dog or your birthday are not eligible. Use a mixture of letters, numbers, and punctuation marks (but no spaces). Use uppercase and lowercase letters. The longer the password, the better. The shorter your password, the easier it is to chop, especially when it is a common word or name. A good starting point is six characters, although 8, 10 or 12 are even better. If you have trouble remembering, do something, consider using an unusual phrase or a combination of words that only some people know, and replace some letters with numbers and/or punctuation. Humorous combinations could make it easier to remember, but otherwise, you should keep your password in a safe place. Or just use the "Forgotten password?" To reset your password.

2. Change your password regularly.

Usually, I mean monthly or even weekly, not annually. Forgot Password? Facebook is a way or you can access your account settings.


3. Don’t  Accept friend Requests for everyone.


This "hot chick" you do not know and look like a Hollywood star might be a guy. Avoid the person who does not even have a profile, much less a friend with you. If you have not met them, be careful. Also, make no friends you know, use weak passwords. If your account is compromised, hackers can learn some things from your profile, or send you a message about your friend's account to lure you into a malicious website.

4. Don’t click on links willy-nilly.

If you click on a status update from a "friend" attached to your wall and it looks suspicious, do not assume it actually worked. Your account may be compromised. When you click on a Facebook application that you are not sure about, there is no obligation to click.

5. Don’t believe all emails.


Keep in mind that honest web services never prompt you to do certain things in an e-mail. For example, Facebook will NOT send you an e-mail asking you to change your password or enter personal information. If they do, they'll tell you where you can work in your account settings. In a similar way, protect your e-mail account that you have saved for Facebook, otherwise, your Facebook password could be successfully reset.


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